Albert and Eloise Williams

Interviewed by Hudson Vaughn and Rob Stephens on March 24, 2010
Rev. Albert Williams is the minister at Staunton Memorial CME Church in Pittsboro. He is a lifetime resident of the area and was the first African American firefighter in Chapel Hill and a native son of St. Joseph CME. Mrs. Williams is also a lifetime resident and active member of Staunton Memorial’s choir. Rev. Williams begins the interview by discussing his family, early career and life in general in the 1960s. This section of the interview has a heavy focus on race and refers to dividing lines in Chapel Hill and Carrboro. As the interview continues, Williams discusses becoming a firefighter and his blossoming role in the community. During this he also reflects upon his time in the military and on very nearly being sent to Vietnam. He then focuses on the powerful role of the church, where Mrs. Williams interjects and offers her opinion on why kindness suffers in the modern world. Throughout the interview he refers to the role of community, the strength of the solidarity among its members, and an unflinching willingness to help others. At the end of the interview he returns to discussing his role as a firefighter and how the fire department plays a role in the community.

View Details

Dublin Core

Title

Albert and Eloise Williams

Description

Rev. Albert Williams is the minister at Staunton Memorial CME Church in Pittsboro. He is a lifetime resident of the area and was the first African American firefighter in Chapel Hill and a native son of St. Joseph CME. Mrs. Williams is also a lifetime resident and active member of Staunton Memorial’s choir. Rev. Williams begins the interview by discussing his family, early career and life in general in the 1960s. This section of the interview has a heavy focus on race and refers to dividing lines in Chapel Hill and Carrboro. As the interview continues, Williams discusses becoming a firefighter and his blossoming role in the community. During this he also reflects upon his time in the military and on very nearly being sent to Vietnam. He then focuses on the powerful role of the church, where Mrs. Williams interjects and offers her opinion on why kindness suffers in the modern world. Throughout the interview he refers to the role of community, the strength of the solidarity among its members, and an unflinching willingness to help others. At the end of the interview he returns to discussing his role as a firefighter and how the fire department plays a role in the community.

Subject

Williams, Albert
Williams, Eloise

Type

Oral History

Creator

Marian Cheek Jackson Center

Publisher

Marian Cheek Jackson Center

Date

2010-03-24

Rights

Open for research.

Format

MP3 (160,000)

Language

English

Identifier

FON_0105

Oral History Item Type Metadata

Interviewer

Hudson Vaughn and Rob Stephens

Interviewee

Albert and Eloise Williams

Interview Date

2010-03-24

Duration

1:37:28

Citation

Marian Cheek Jackson Center, “Albert and Eloise Williams,” Marian Cheek Jackson Center Oral History Trust, accessed May 30, 2020, https://archives.jacksoncenter.info/items/show/457.

Related Content

Albert Williams teaching 8th graders at Smith Middle School about the civil rights movement in Chapel Hill, February, 2014.
Weaving_Histories,_Stories,_and_Lives/1-It_was_Time!/B-Min_Williams_with_8th_grade.jpg
High school sweethearts, gracious hosts, committed servant leaders, the Reverend and Mrs. Williams, lifetime residents of Chapel Hill, chose to photographed in front of their beautiful home.
Rev. Williams was the first African American firefighter in Chapel Hill. Listen to hear more of his reflections.
http://stallmann.mayfirst.org/omeka/Facing_Our_Neighbors/___Facing_Our_Neighbors_Photos/FON_14.JPG