Northside News Volume VI, Edition 11

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Northside News Volume VI, Edition 11

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NN_6.11

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“Northside News Volume VI, Edition 11,” Marian Cheek Jackson Center Oral History Trust, accessed July 11, 2020, https://archives.jacksoncenter.info/items/show/1195.

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Ronnie Bynum was born in Chapel Hill in 1959 as one of seven children. His grandfather and grandmother were from Chatham County, North Carolina. They moved to town for work, and his family spent many years living on Lindsay Street and later Mitchell Lane in the Northside neighborhood. Ronnie joined the military at the age…
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In this interview, Ronnie Bynum discusses his family history, including the career of his grandmother as a midwife and the changes she witnessed on Airport Road, which is now MLK Boulevard. He talks about how much he learned from his grandmother, and how easily it is for the fabric of an extended family to break when an…
Born and raised in Northside, Katherine "Mama Kat" Council describes herself as a happy person who has lived a good life, despite hardships. She is an active member of St. Joseph CME church, volunteers constantly at the Heavenly Groceries food ministry and is a Community Mentor who loves children and never hesitates to…
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This interview provides an overview of the place and birth of Mama Kat. Her house burnt down in 1962. She notes the change in neighbors versus before. She had children graduating from college. Her 3 kids were in college at the same time. The last baby was born with down syndrome. She recounts the change in the community in…
At “Heavenly Groceries,” Mama Kat and Belinda, both lifetime residents of Chapel Hill/Carrboro and First Baptist Church members, offer food with a large serving of good humor and warmth. Mama Kat’s oldest daughter, Caroline, a leader of the local civil rights movement, moved to Canada to escape laws that barred marriage to…
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In this interview, Katherine “Mama Kat” Council talks about home and family. She discusses her parents, including her father’s death and her mother’s garden, and she describes where she grew up in rural Chapel Hill. Growing up was very different when Mama Kat was a child; she went to work and started a family early. She…
In this impromptu interview done at Heavenly Groceries Food Ministry, Katherine “Mama Kat” Council tells us what it was like growing up right outside of Carrboro back in the 1930’s. She recalls how for a while her family had to use a wagon to get to Hamlet’s Chapel CME on Sundays. She also discusses how her children ended…
In Molly Norwood’s interview of Katherine “Mama Kat” Council, Council begins by describing what life was like when she was growing up in Chapel Hill. She describes how open and geographically spread out the neighborhood was, how she was constantly playing with the other children in the neighborhood, and the tight-knit feel…
In this interview, Mama Kat gives us her coveted pound cake recipe, which she knows from memory because she makes it so often.
This interview is a part of the Marian Cheek Jackson Center’s A Place at the Table series. Katherine Council and Lillian Alston talk about their time volunteering with Heavenly Groceries. Katherine describes the origin of the food ministry before both women discuss their ties to the community and the people in it. In this…
Ms. Council, fondly known as Mama Kat, grew up on a farm in Chapel Hill down Jones Ferry Road and has lived in various places in the area her entire life. She went to the Northside school when it was just a one-room schoolhouse. She grew up as one of nine children and had lots of kids herself: one of her daughters was one…
Lillie Edwards was born in Wake County and moved to Durham at a young age with her family. After graduating from high school in Durham, she moved to Gomains Street in Northside where she met her husband, Russell Edwards. She raised her three children in Northside and was a very active member of St. Joseph CME. She had a…
Lillie recounts on her first experiences with cooking bread as a young girl. She was the designated cook of the family. She also talks about her mother’s cooking style since her mother does not use standard recipes to cook. Juanita speaks about Mama Dip (her aunt) being the head cook in her family. Mama Dip raised her and…
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Donny Hollywood Riggsbee, a bachelor, gemini, grew up in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He remembers the last few decades in North Carolina, reflecting on the fond memories of his family and friends. He reflects on his time at UNC, working in housing and Lenoir dining hall. He shares his entertainment as a child, explaining…

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This interview provides insight into the background of Donny “Hollywood” Riggsbee, a long-term Northside neighborhood resident. He shares his experiences living with 12 siblings, the areas of NC in which he lived, and his family’s interactions with UNC students. Hollywood goes into depth about how his parents met in Chatham…
Donny ‘Hollywood’ Riggsbee, resident of Chapel Hill, gives his biography during his time in in the town. He describes his youth, growing with 10 siblings, how his mother worked in a kitchen and how the kids worked while growing up. He talks about racial experiences in the form of his employer (Big John) who segregated…
In the interview Mrs. Webb discusses her neighborhood and describes how the house that she grew up in was demolished by the state in order to build a road in its place. Her parents did not want to move but believed that if they refused the state’s offer their home would have been condemned; thus, they chose to get at least…