Northside News Volume II, Edition 5

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Northside News Volume II, Edition 5

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NN_2.5

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“Northside News Volume II, Edition 5,” Marian Cheek Jackson Center Oral History Trust, accessed July 5, 2020, https://archives.jacksoncenter.info/items/show/1157.

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Keith Edwards is a native of Chapel Hill and has been a leader in the community for decades. Keith was one of the first black students to integrate Chapel Hill Junior High School in seventh grade. Ms. Keith later went on to work as a police officer for UNC Campus police. During her time as a police officer she fought and…
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